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Smoothly Scrolling RapidWeaver Pages

Just two days ago there was a question on the Weaver's Space "How do I get a page to smoothly scroll to an anchor from a text link?"
The question was answered immediately – "SmoothScroll". Now this is strange, as I'd only received Jeroen's newsletter (Marathia's Stacks) just ten minutes before! Some people, you see, do open newsletters when they flatter into their mailbox!

SmoothScroll is a stack (or rather – a set of three stacks) that does exactly as it says on the tin – once it's placed on your page, the page will smoothly scroll to its position when a link is clicked.
Three stacks. SmoothScroll is the central stack, but it is accompanied by Anchor To TopBottom and Menu ToAnchor. Now, if I'd had these stacks three days ago, I'd have known exactly where to utilise them. As it is, I settled for a more complicated option.

SmoothScroll itself is a very simple stack. Drop it on your page and set an Anchor Name – a unique ID (you'll have more than one on your page – right?). Then all you need to do is add a link '#[Anchor Name]' to a text, image, or button. As simple as that. When the link is clicked, your page will smoothly scroll to where SmoothScroll is positioned.

SmoothScroll
Now it's difficult to make a screenshot of a smoothly scrolling webpage – just believe me – it works perfectly! I spent a couple of hours testing the various possibilities.

So what are the other two stacks?
Anchor To TopBottom is an anchor stack that can be placed at the top and/or bottom of a page. It has just two settings Set Anchor (top/bottom) and an ID. Once again, a link with '#[ID]' will send you to whichever position you have defined.

Menu ToAnchor is slightly more complicated and I needed Jeroen's demo project to get my head around it. But then, I'm thick sometimes.
Let's say you have a single page website and you want the menu bar to display the SmoothScroll sections on your page.
Define the sections using SmoothScroll and then drop Menu ToAnchor onto your page. Now add an Offsite Page for each of the sections to your project, give the pages the same name as your sections ID (just so that they are easily identifiable, then simply set '#' as the URL and activate Use Redirect Page.

Menu ToAnchor already displays a link – give this link the same Anchor Name as your first section, in the stack's settings and then go to Set Link and link to your Offsite Page.
You can now click the + button to add a child stack and repeat the process for as many SmoothScroll sections as you have on your page.

The result – your menu bar is now populated with the SmoothScroll sections on your page! When you click a menu entry, your page will smoothly scroll down (up, if you have a sticky menu) to the appropriate section.
You can, of course, combine all three linking methods as displayed in the screenshot above. I.E. in the menu bar, you'll see the chapter names then, underneath the chapters, you'll see links to each of the other chapters, plus links to the top and bottom of the page.

At first glance, SmoothScroll would seem to be a simple stack, but lot of thought has gone into it and I can highly recommend it.

Comments

Show Call To Action On Scroll For RapidWeaver

Jeroen at Marathia's stacks can always be relied upon to produce interesting stacks. His latest product, ScrollShow is a flexible CTA stack that can load with your page, or be set to appear when your visitor scrolls the page.

Why do I say flexible? Because ScrollShow has a number of options to display/position the stack – we'll get to that shortly; you get to decide exactly when it is displayed and you can drop almost anything into it that you want.

Example: You want to display a CTA when your visitor has scrolled 500px down the page. With a teaser and a button to link to a special offer. Or you want to display a menu bar at the bottom of the page (DeFliGra's MenuList is ideal for this) when your TopBar has been scrolled out of view – and have the menu disappear again, when the page is scrolled back up.

ScrollShow

The CTA above is set to display once the page is scrolled down 400px, but to disappear again when the page has been scrolled down a further 400px. It can be clicked away and won't appear again until the page is refreshed. No page content is permanently hidden from view.

Stack settings.

Action. The options are Show, or Hide.
Show/Hide… The options are When Scrolling Down At Least… When Scrolling Down Between… and Always.
Scroll Position displays the pixel values for the above options.
When Scrolling Up gives the options Do Nothing, Hide When Shown and Show When Hidden.
Transition Speed. Can be set between 0 and 1000 milliseconds.
Position. Allows nine different positions on the page – combinations of top, bottom, left, right, or centre.
Distance From. Pixel distance from the edge of the page.
Width. Popup width in percent. It is also possible to set both a Minimum and a Maximum width in px.

Content Settings
Custom Font Size. Font Family has three options – Theme Default, Web Safe Font, or Custom.
Custom Text Colour. Custom Link Colour. Custom Link Underlining. Custom Heading Size. Custom Heading Colour.

There are further options to activate a Close Button, three options for the Close Icon, Icon Size and Icon Colours for Static, Hover and Active.
The Icon Position can be set to the Left, or The Right of the open Popup.

You can look forward to seeing ScrollShow on this page in the near future!


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Listify – RapidWeaver Lists Demystified

Every now and then, our clients insist that we need to place lists on their websites. We can, of course, build a simple bulleted list using the tools that RapidWeaver supplies. There are also a couple of developers that have stacks in their line up, to help us spice up said lists. Just in time for the Easter holidays, 1LD released Listify, a set of stacks that will let you build truly eye catching lists.

Listify is a set of three stacks that will help you build professional lists within your Stacks pages. The basic stack, Listify, is a container for individual List Items. You can either click the stack's + button to create a List Item child, or drag in a List Item stack. The third stack is Listify Group; a container that allows you to create groups of list and automagically builds responsive columns to contain them.
The clever thing about Listify is that you can drop anything into it that you please…

Lets take a basic list. Drop Listify into a stacks page and add a List Item.
The List Item Displays an Icon and a Text Field. Enter your text, add a new List Item – as many as you need – and you have bulleted list.
If you need a headline, you can either enlarge the text in the first Item (see the image below), or you can add a container to the Item and drop in a Header stack (hover over the image below). You can, of course drop in an image, or a button into the List Item Stacks and switch off the default icon and text display.

Each List Item may be formatted individually, or – by leaving the default settings – the completed list may be configured as a whole. Once you've studied the settings panel you'll find that the configuration is really simple.
Tip. If you wish to set up individually formatted List Items, begin with one Item. Once you have finished the basic formatting, duplicate the Item and then reconfigure. You'll find it a lot easier than setting up each Item from scratch.

Listify
Stack settings.
The basic Listify stack provides the settings for the overall look and feel of your list. The List Fill Mode determines the width of your list – either Full Width (of the container it is placed in), or Pixel Width. The List Radius is set to a default of 5px whilst with the List Padding and the List Margins are set to 10px T, B, L & R.
The Background is set to Off by default, but may contain a solid Colour, a Gradient, or an Image.
Both the Borders and the Shadow are Off by default.
List Items (Shared Styles). The following settings will affect every List Item within the Listify stack:
Indent Direction (Left/Right), Item Indentation (px), Align Content (Left. Centre, Right, Separate (Icon & Text)), Item Spacing (default 5px), Item Radius (default 5px), Item Margin, Background and Border.
List Item Fonts gives you a choice of 13 standard Google Fonts, or (just to prove that 1LD listens to their customers) Custom. Text Size (px) and Text Colour.
List Item Icons (Shared Styles). Here you get to set the standard formatting for the icons: Vertical and Horizontal Positioning, Icon Padding and Spacing, Icon Radius and Icon Size. The Icon Background can once more contain a solid Colour, Gradient, or Image. Oh, and the Icon Colour itself, of course!
The default Icon is a Google Material Icons star. The icons are set individually for each List Item, with a choice of GMI's, Font Awesome, or Ion Icons.

Listify Item. The individual Items may be Linked to an external source. The next setting is Item Level. Each Item may be set to up to 10 (in words TEN!) Sub Levels! Excuse the overuse of exclamation marks (points if you're American) but this is amazing!
Next you have the option to Override Shared Styles. If this option is activated, each List Item may be individually styled. With the exception of Custom Stack Content and the Icon setting, the list of formatting options that follows is identical to those already listed above, including the individual visibility settings for the three screen sizes.

Finally, we come to the List Group stack.
As already stated, if you drop two, three, or more individual Listify stacks into a Group, your list is automatically columnised.
The List Group Stack also has some interesting features, though.
The List Alignment is set to Centred by default, but may also be set to Top, or Bottom. Then you'll find a setting Wrap List for Mobile Tablet (Portrait) and Desktop. Then there are settings for the group's Background – again None, Solid Colour, Gradient, or Image, Group Radius and Group Padding. The whole group may, of course be hidden at different screen sizes.

Hover over the image above, and you'll see just how flexible Listify really is – and that's without having added button stacks, or images!

Kool, or wot?


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Liquid Image Slider

At the risk of repeating myself – every Stacks developer has at least one slideshow in his stables. We're really spoiled for choice. Variety enlivens business, so to add some life to the scene, here's another one. Liquid Gallery from RWExtras.

Liquid Gallery is an attractive, responsive and versatile gallery that is simple to set up, yet offers options and silky smooth transitions that other gallery stacks don't have. Twenty eight transitions in all, including a simple fade, blinds and mosaics. Options include animated captions that gently slide up into view once an image has loaded and thumbnails. Images and thumbnails may be dragged into the stack or loaded from warehoused images.

Once Liquid Gallery is dragged into your project, you'll find a stack with extensive setup instructions (which, of course, may be hidden) and the Stacks 3 + button to add a child stack. The child stack has two options: Dragged And Dropped Image, or Warehoused Image. Choosing Dragged And Dropped presents you with an Image Container, a Thumbnail Container and a Caption Container, whilst Warehoused has the same Caption Container plus the settings for your linked image/thumbnail. There is also an option for both dragged and warehoused images to set an external link.

The instructions advise that the Caption may be added via either simple text, an HTML, or a Markdown stack. I'm lazy, so I tried adding a paragraph stack – which worked equally well. The caption formatting is governed by the theme that you choose.

Liquid


Stack settings.
Liquid Gallery first requires you to choose where your gallery should be positioned. The default setting is Normal Page Flow. The options are Theme Extra Content Container, or Theme Flood Freestyle Banner.
Next you can agonise over the Transition Effect. Did I mention that you have a choice of 28 transitions? All silky smooth? The Transition Speed and the Interval are set in milliseconds. A Progress Indicator is added by default, but may be deactivated. The Loader Type may be set to Pie (default), or Bar. The Pie position can be set further down in the stack's settings, the progress bar is displayed below the images.
The next stack options include nine settings for the navigation display and an option to crop portrait images.

The Liquid Gallery Style Settings include Button Theme with a myriad of colours to choose from, Pie Position, Loader Padding, Loader Stroke, Pie Size and Loader Colour. The remaining settings cover the Caption Content colours, the Pagination colours and the Thumbnail settings.
As already mentioned above, both captions and thumbnails are optional.

Liquid Gallery is well thought through. It's settings are quite minimalistic, but the results are beautiful. And – as with all RWE stacks – Great value for money.

Comments

Side Menu

1LD has enlarged their team. More team members means more capacity which, amongst other things, results in more stacks for happy Weavers. Just a fortnight ago, I reviewed Overlay Menu. Yesterday Side Menu was added to 1LD's range of products.

Side Menu is very closely related to Overlay Menu, it is equally highly configurable, but instead of overlaying the whole page, it slides out from the left, or from the right and is exactly as wide as you want it to be. Just like Overlay Menu, Side Menu can reflect the RapidWeaver site menu, or it can contain a custom list of links. For this reason, multiple instances of Side Menu can be placed on a stacks page.

The menu initially shows up as a black sidebar on the left of the page, with a black menu button in the top righthand corner. This is a configuration that is often seen on current websites but, not being a mortician, I'm not especially fond of this appearance. So let's take a look at the settings panel to see if we can change it.

The first setting is Unique Menu ID. Necessary because, as already stated, you can have multiple instances of Side Menu on each page. If you only intend to have one instance, you can leave the default ID unaltered.
Use Custom List is the next checkbox you'll encounter. Check it if you want a custom links list. Leave it unchecked if you need a site menu.

Now the party can begin: The Menu Configuration sets out with position – Left, or right – and continues with Font Family. Once again, you'll find a choice of twelve Google Fonts and once again, I ask myself – if Google Fonts are implemented, why can't I just enter the name of the font I want to use? Whatever – I'm sure you'll find a suitable font for your site amongst the twelve.

Side Menu

The Text Alignment may be set to Left, Right, or Centre and the Menu Fill Mode can be set to Pixels or Percent. The default setting is px.
Next follow individual settings for the menu width when displayed on Mobile, Tablet and Desktop. The menu Padding is set in px.
Next up is the Background opacity, followed by Background [content], which may be set to Off, Colour, Gradient, or Image. Images are centred and set to fill the menu height.
Image Cover will set a colour overlay for the background image – a nice effect.

As demonstrated in the screenshot, the Menu can contain a Header and/or a Footer. You may drop any stacks you please in the child stacks, but don't forget that the longer your link list, the less room you will have available. As also demonstrated in the screenshot, when the menu is opened, the site's scroll bar is hidden.

Next up: Dropdown Icons. The Icon Size for the icon that appears next to your link list to indicate sub-pages is set to a default of 24px. The Open Icon Font may be chosen from Google Material Icons, Font Awesome, or ION. Open Icon awaits the code of your choice. The same applies to the Close Icon.
Rotate Icon When Opened has its own settings for Degrees.

Top Level Menu Items has options for Font Size, Subtitle Size (for custom link lists), Padding and Vertical Spacing. Radius refers to the button radius. Then we have Text Colour and Subtitle Colour. While the Text Colour is a solid colour, the Subtitle Colour may be translucent.
The Button Background can be set to Off, Colour, or Gradient. The Gradient settings thankfully only have two colours and produce a very smooth gradient. The Direction can be Top to Bottom, Left to Right, Right to Left, or Diagonal.
Hover Text Colour and Hover Subtitle Colour are set individually, as is the Hover Background.

Sub Level Menu Items automatically inherit the Top Level Font, but the Font Size may be set individually. The Indent may be set either with a default Margin, or a default Padding. Margin and Padding can not be altered in this case.
The Sub Level Menu Items are also set to inherit the Top Level colours, but there is a checkbox to override the settings.

Menu Toggle. Show Toggle Text and Show Toggle Icon are the first two checkboxes. The Toggle Text Font may be set individually from the Item Font, as can the Toggle Font Size. The Toggle Text is set to 'Menu' by default. The same Icon options are available once more and the Font Size for the Icon is set individually from the text.
The Toggle Fill Mode is interesting. By default, it is set to Auto, but the options are Fill (full width), Pixel Width, or Percentage Width.
The Menu Toggle is at the top right by default, but the Vertical and the Horizontal alignment may be altered, as may the Margin, Padding and Radius.
Once more we have multiple options for the Background and Hover settings, Plus Border and Shadow options.

I was irritated that the Overlay Menu Close Button couldn't be configured [at initial release]. This is not the case with Side Menu. The close button is as equally highly configurable as everything else. Hats off! ILD always listens to constructive criticism.

Advanced Settings. Here you'll find Show External Data Link Info and Make Parent Links Clickable.
Experimental. As with Overlay Menu, there is an options to Replace Theme Menu. This will not automatically work with all themes, but as mentioned last time, there are other stacks, that offer assistance here.

I liked Overlay Menu very much – it is highly configurable and is different.
I like Side Menu even more. It is more traditional so it will find wider acceptance and, if anything, it is more highly configurable than its sister stack.
Thumbs Up!

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