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Zoom, Zoom – Magnify images in RapidWeaver

Many online stores have a useful feature – if you hover over an image of the article you're viewing, the image will enlarge underneath your mouse so that you can view details.
Image Zoom from RWextras used to do exactly that, however, it disappeared for a while. Now it's back – freshly updated and free of charge!
RWextras Zoomy

Zoomy is the new name for a simple stack that enables an attractive magnification effect for RapidWeaver images. Magnification can take place on mouseover, grab, or click. There are also a couple of other settings built in to change aspects such as the zoom amount, animation speed and mouse cursor.

Zoomy will work either with images you drag and drop into RapidWeaver or images stored in a warehouse location. Compatibility is offered with all major web browsers. And Zoomy is responsive.


Stack settings.
Image source allows you to add either Dragged and Dropped Images, or Warehoused Images.
Mouse Cursor gives you the option of seven different cursor styles.
Zoom Trigger has the options Click, Grab, Mousover, or Toggle – Grab is my favourite.
Duration sets the fadeout time once the cursor leaves the image.
Magnification is a percentage of the original size for the enlargement.

Looking for further settings? You'll be hard pressed to find any, the above are all that's needed.

Zoomy is a neat little stack that does exactly as it says on the tin and has the advantage of being both responsive and free.

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ProGallery – A Masterful Gallery For RapidWeaver

Pro Gallery, one of Stacks4Stacks' most popular products, has just been updated to version 2. One of the performance saving enhancements is lazy loading, which results in much larger galleries being feasible. If you have a large portfolio of images, or videos, you may wish to take a closer look…

Will's demo gallery contains 117 images and is close to 400MB in size. Quite a risky and time consuming undertaking in most cases, however, with ProGallery a gallery of this magnitude is not only possible, it's also quite simple to set up.
With lazy loading/progressive loading, the image, or video that is currently requested is called from the server on demand, thus preserving bandwidth.

The ProGallery lightbox itself has been completely rebuilt and the clutter has been removed. The controls and the titles are no longer within the displayed image, but are placed outside of it, thus allowing the viewer to focus on the image itself. Keyboard navigation has been implemented, as has swipe actions on mobile devices. In addition to an image title, a caption text can now be added.

ProGallery

Stack settings.

Once you've dragged a ProGallery stack to your page and clicked the + button to add a child stack, you'll see that there are now four options to add images to your Gallery.

Single Image is the simplest solution. The settings panel displays three image wells for local, or warehoused images. Thumbnail, Large Lightbox Image and High Resolution Lightbox Image. Below these options you can add both an Image Title and an Image Caption. You will then see Alternative Link: Set Link button?
The Lightbox can be disabled. Setting a link to the thumbnail then gives you the option of linking to external pages. These pages could be product pages, or further galley pages.

Single Video is similar to Single Image. The thumbnail can be a local or a warehoused image. The Video Link will accept any video that can be embedded within a page. ProGallery will automatically discern the video format. Once more, both a Title and a Caption may be added.

Directory Of Images. One means of simplifying building a large gallery of images, is to upload the images, high-res images and thumbnails (with _thumb, or @2 appended to the name) to a server and add a .php-relative path to the Directory Path in the settings panel (html will not functions here). Then set the options Use Thumbnails and/or Use Retina Images accordingly. Your index page must then be set to .php instead of .html
ProGallery will then automatically load your images into a gallery.

CSV File. As before, ProGallery will accept a CSV file as a gallery source. The file format has now been extended to include Retina Images and Captions.

The ProGallery main stack settings are too numerous to list here, but you can take full control of your gallery appearance. The settings include Gallery ID (you may have more than one gallery on a page) Grid Type, Special effects (only for modern browsers), Transition Speed and multitudinous settings for the Lightbox.

It remains to be said that – apart from the thumbnails – there are three further options to trigger the ProGallery Lightbox. You may use a link, or a button to open the lightbox, you may do the same to open a specific image from the gallery, and you can trigger a specific slide on page load. These options are all explained in detail on the product page.

ProGallery, then, has now advanced from being one of the best gallery stacks available for RapidWeaver to one of the very best.The magnitude of possibilities make it a pleasure to set up and its reliability when building large galleries makes it second to none.

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Smoothly Scrolling RapidWeaver Pages

Just two days ago there was a question on the Weaver's Space "How do I get a page to smoothly scroll to an anchor from a text link?"
The question was answered immediately – "SmoothScroll". Now this is strange, as I'd only received Jeroen's newsletter (Marathia's Stacks) just ten minutes before! Some people, you see, do open newsletters when they flatter into their mailbox!

SmoothScroll is a stack (or rather – a set of three stacks) that does exactly as it says on the tin – once it's placed on your page, the page will smoothly scroll to its position when a link is clicked.
Three stacks. SmoothScroll is the central stack, but it is accompanied by Anchor To TopBottom and Menu ToAnchor. Now, if I'd had these stacks three days ago, I'd have known exactly where to utilise them. As it is, I settled for a more complicated option.

SmoothScroll itself is a very simple stack. Drop it on your page and set an Anchor Name – a unique ID (you'll have more than one on your page – right?). Then all you need to do is add a link '#[Anchor Name]' to a text, image, or button. As simple as that. When the link is clicked, your page will smoothly scroll to where SmoothScroll is positioned.

SmoothScroll
Now it's difficult to make a screenshot of a smoothly scrolling webpage – just believe me – it works perfectly! I spent a couple of hours testing the various possibilities.

So what are the other two stacks?
Anchor To TopBottom is an anchor stack that can be placed at the top and/or bottom of a page. It has just two settings Set Anchor (top/bottom) and an ID. Once again, a link with '#[ID]' will send you to whichever position you have defined.

Menu ToAnchor is slightly more complicated and I needed Jeroen's demo project to get my head around it. But then, I'm thick sometimes.
Let's say you have a single page website and you want the menu bar to display the SmoothScroll sections on your page.
Define the sections using SmoothScroll and then drop Menu ToAnchor onto your page. Now add an Offsite Page for each of the sections to your project, give the pages the same name as your sections ID (just so that they are easily identifiable, then simply set '#' as the URL and activate Use Redirect Page.

Menu ToAnchor already displays a link – give this link the same Anchor Name as your first section, in the stack's settings and then go to Set Link and link to your Offsite Page.
You can now click the + button to add a child stack and repeat the process for as many SmoothScroll sections as you have on your page.

The result – your menu bar is now populated with the SmoothScroll sections on your page! When you click a menu entry, your page will smoothly scroll down (up, if you have a sticky menu) to the appropriate section.
You can, of course, combine all three linking methods as displayed in the screenshot above. I.E. in the menu bar, you'll see the chapter names then, underneath the chapters, you'll see links to each of the other chapters, plus links to the top and bottom of the page.

At first glance, SmoothScroll would seem to be a simple stack, but lot of thought has gone into it and I can highly recommend it.

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Email Templates For RapidWeaver

"The Chief", Joe Workman, has been working on a new RapidWeaver addon for quite some time now.
Email for RapidWeaver is finally here!.
If you or your clients send out email campaigns, this may be just what you've been waiting for – create your next campaign in familiar surroundings – RapidWeaver!

Email was released a couple of days ago, but you'll have to search for it. There's no mention of it on Joe Workman's website – his blog is only updated annually – but hey! I found the link for you!
Email has quietly secured its own web page.

So what's all the hype about? Email is a Foundation based set of stacks that will allow you to build fully responsive marketing campaigns using your favourite app – RapidWeaver, in combination with Stacks 3. If you know how to build a simple web page, then you already know how to build a marketing campaign or a newsletter.

In a similar fashion to Foundation the suite includes a Theme and more than 15 stacks. The stacks will allow you to create a single, or multiple column design with the addition of buttons and CTA's.

Foundation Email

When setting out to build an email template, you need to check a couple of things first:
When you drag the Styles stack onto your page and open the stack settings, you'll see a to-do list. An 'Implementation List' that instructs you to Set the Email Theme; Disable Advanced General Settings; Set Title To Subject (the subject of your mail); Set Slogan To Description; Use Only Email Stacks.
Yes, should only use the stacks from the Email suite. Why? Although your email will be HTML, the HTML format that mail apps can render has failed to evolve alongside the www since the turn of the century, hence modern stacks will fail to render correctly.

The Email suite consists of the Styles stack, which has a very similar structure to that of the Foundation Styles; One, Two, Three and Four-Column stacks; a Button; a Callout (CTA); a Divider; an HTML and a Markdown stack; a Header; an Image stack; a Link List; a Spacer; a Visibility stack; a Wrapper and of course a Text stack.
Using the above stacks, you won't be able to replicate a client's website exactly (remember HTML for email is still stuck in the 90's), but you will be able to get pretty damned close – a lot closer than any of the online tools from MailChimp etc. will let you get. And working with Email is a lot easier than the online editors too.

And when you're finished, you can upload your template to one of the online mail services and send it out.
Email has gained only positive comments on the forums since its release and is already widely accepted as the mail template 'app' to use!

Don't know where to start? On the Email homepage, you'll find 15 great templates to download free of charge, with the promise of more to come…

MailChimp & Co, here we come!

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Take Control Of HTML In RapidWeaver

Many professional web designers have tried the RapidWeaver demo version and rejected it for its lack of HTML support. Stacks adds an HTML box to your arsenal, we've all seen it; we've all used it, but no-one in their right mind would try to build a complete website using HTML boxes.
Now dedicated coders have no excuse for not using RapidWeaver; HTML Body Stack from 1LD even makes it easier!

So you're a hardcore coder and you want to build your website using RW. You will need Stacks 3 and a copy of the HTML Body Stack which comes with a dedicated blank theme.

You may, of course use any theme you like, but hey, you're hardcore and you want full access to the <head> and <body>, right? These are preconfigured when you use themes. Not the case with 1LD's Blank Theme – it's blank and just begging for an HTML Body stack.

Let's start a new project.
Open a new Stacks project, choose the HTML Body Blank theme and then check your Stacks' library for HTML Body. Drag this stack onto your page and hey! It looks like Stacks, but it works like HTML. It has three themes for the editing mode – the Standard Stacks' theme, Light and dark.
You added it to your page already? You now have a <head> and Before <body> elements on your page, but both have the 'Add Child' + button!
Go on – click the + button in the <head> area. Now you can link your CSS and meta tags, etc. or, may the heavens forbid, a stack.

Same thing with the <body>. Click the + button and add your HTML content, non-wrapped HTML, or a stack.
I know some people who are going to love this.
Imagine – we're halfway down our new HTML page and it's looking great. But we need an image slider. So off we go to make coffee – that always helps us concentrate when browsing that code that we need. But wait – time is tight. We need the slider now, this instant.
What is easier than dragging one in from the stacks library? So what, if you didn't code it yourself (i.e. borrow the code from the web), forget vanity; time is tight – remember?

HTML Body

But now, watch this – I'm working on a Foundation project and just discovered the source code for a cool calendar. I drag an HTML Element stack into my project and add the code to it. It is already surrounded by <divs> and I can add as many child stacks to it as I need.

1LD created HTML Body as a way to give themselves the control they wanted to have in order to create HTML templates for their own web development projects.

Using a hybrid Stacks/HTML editor gives RapidWeaver users the ability to really mold projects into whatever they need them to be, whether they need to include simple to use RapidWeaver Stacks or import advanced external libraries.
To get you started 1LD has thoughtfully included a free project file that they created with Bootstrap. The project contains 5 sections that you can save as partials for use in other projects. Perhaps we might even see a Foundation project soon?

If you have little, or no HTML/CSS experience or suffer from code phobia, this is not the stack for you — 1LD can only support the stacks and theme, but not our inability (and yes, I include myself) to understand what all those <div>s, </p>s and <span>s are about.

If you're a coder and use RapidWeaver for the obvious ease of use that it offers, HTML Body is exactly the stack that you've wished for all these years.

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