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Flexible Grid Stack For RapidWeaver

"I'll be back…", he said. And here he is as Gridinator! You may already have heard about Weavium – they are a new stacks developer with currently four stacks in their lineup. They're so new (a couple of months), that they aren't even listed on RapidWeaverCentral yet (shame on you Marten…) and little is known about them/her/him.
Weavium announced two stacks yesterday 'Image Card' and 'Gridinator'. More about Image Card at a later date.

Gridinator is, as the name implies, 'The Simplest And Most Robust Grid Stack That You've Ever Seen' (taken directly from the developers web page). And it is great stack.
Build a grid with up to 50 (in words – fifty!) columns and fill the columns with whatever you please.
A single column can span multiple grid sections making Gridinator very adjustable. Build just about any page structure that you can imagine.

Weavium Gridinator

The page section pictured above was built in just five minutes without having previously read a manual. And that includes the addition of Image Card (left column).

When you drop a Gridnator stack onto your page, you'll see a container for the first column, into which you can drop your stacks. The + button will add a child stack for the next column. The stacks interface is rather interesting – it displays a simplified image that shows how Gridinator will display on a desktop, tablet, and mobile.

Weavium Gridnator
Stack settings

Trouble Shooting
Show Edit Helpers – Displays a frame around each column in both edit and preview mode and displays the breakpoints.
General
No Outer Gutters – Deactivated by default
Max Width
Tablet Break
Mobile Break
Columns > Desktop – Number of Columns Per Row
Gutter Width – Left, Right
Column Padding – Horzontal. Vertical
The Column settings are repeated for Tablet and Mobile.
And that's all there is to it.

Weavium has a special introductory offer with 25% off – and the offer includes Image Card. So grab it while its hot. You won't be disappointed.
And about Image Card — I'll be back…

Comments

Expanding Content in RapidWeaver

There are numerous ways of adding extensive content to RapidWeaver without disrupting a page's design. One Little Designer recently added Expanse to their lineup; a clean and efficient solution to the age-old problem.

Expanse is an animated lightbox stack that appears on your page as an info card. What said card looks like is entirely up to you.

If you drag an Expanse stack onto your page, the initial settings display containers for an image, a headline, a subhead and a Stacks container. Both the default width and height are set to 320px. Once you have dragged in an image and added your content, you can check the preview. It will display your image with a plus button which, when clicked, expands the card to fill your page.
Adjusting Expand's initial height will allow more, or less of your content to be displayed below the image – the Header and subheader, for instance, or the first few lines of text.
If we explore further, we find that there are three different card types: Template | Icon Button (default), Custom | Hover & Click and Custom | Button. The two custom cards allow you to create unique layouts for the cards.

Both Custom versions of Expanse have a Stacks container for your content, into which you may add as many stacks as you wish. The difference between the two, is that Custom | Hover & Click displays an overlay with a text – "Click To Open" for instance – when hovered, whilst Custom | Button has a button to open the lightbox.

1LD Expanse
Stack settings

The first settings are Animation [type] and Speed. There is a choice of eleven different animations for the lightbox display.
Card Layout
Card Type – As mentioned above
Card Width, Card Height, Margin T/B
Card Styles
Header Image – Drag & Drop
Card Colours – Background, Title, Subtitle, Text
Button Colours – Background, Icon, Close Background, Icon
Button Icons – Four different button options
Inherit Link Colours (active by default)
Border Radius
Shadow
Title Font – (default: Inherit)
Text Font – (default: Inherit)
Truncate Type – Ellipses, Gradient Fade, Clip

Expanded Layout (Lightbox settings)
Content Width
Margins
Padding T/B
Padding L/R
Z-Index

Expanse is very quickly and very easily set up and can display both your condensed and your expanded content just as you wish. There are a couple of sites that I'd have designed differently, had this stack been available earlier.
The demo page is well worth a look at.

Comments

Image Mapper for RapidWeaver

In June of this year, I reviewed HotSpots Pro from S4S. A few days ago Will re-released an updated version of the one-time Tsooj Media stack ImageMapper – also as a Stacks4Stacks product. Hot Spots; Image Maps — potentially the same thing, so does it make sense to have two stacks that, essentially, do the same thing housed within the same stables?

Let's do a quick recap. Hotspots allows you to overlay image areas with live rectangles, or with Fontawesome icons. The rectangles and icons can each be linked to a URL, for instance, or a lightbox.

S4S Hotspots
ImageMapper allows you to overlay an image with rectangles, triangles, hexagons and circles, but more importantly – with a mapped area…

S4S ImageMapper


… And I was astonished to find that it's easier to add a polygon form than it is to add a simple circle, or square.
So how does it work? First, obviously, you drag ImageMapper into a Stacks page and add an image to the image well. The image may be dragged and dropped, or warehoused.
Adding a polygonal area to your image is simple – Activate Show Coordinates Inspector in the stack settings panel and switch to preview. With the crosshairs that are now available, click around the area that you'd like to highlight, clicking on the starting point a second time to close the polygon, just like Photoshop etc.
Below the image, you will now see a list of your coordinates. Copy the coordinates, paste them into the ImageMapper Area child stack, deactivate Show Coordinates in the main stack and switch back to preview.
Now when you hover over the enclosed area, it will have a highlighted overlay with a tooltip. You can add a Link to the ImageMapper Area stack, which you can set to open a URL, open a lightbox, or to a link somewhere else on the page – product details, for instance.
In the screenshot above, I have superimposed four different image maps. They appear one at a time, of course.

So how do you add something as 'simple' as a circular overlay? You need three coordinates: 1 – the position from the left of the image; 2 – the position from the top; 3 – the radius of the circle – all coordinates are separated by a comma. My tip: In the ImageMapper Area child, choose your shape – Circle, or Rectangle and then adjust the size and position whilst in preview.
For more complicated shapes, such as a triangle, or an octagon, load an image of the shape to begin with; map the shape out with the crosshairs and then copy the coordinates into your final image The base stack provides a square, a triangle, a circle and a hexagon to get you started. The hexagon is already mapped out.

Stack settings

ImageMapper
Data Source – Set up your Image maps using either the child stacks, or an HTML image map
Image Source – Dragged and Dropped, or Warehoused
Show Coordinate Inspector – See above
Area Mousover Colouring – Fill Colour, Stroke Colour
Fill Opacity
Stroke Opacity
Stroke Width
Fade Speed

ImageMapper Area
Area Title – Title for the tooltip
Area Link
Area Coordinates
Custom Area Attributes – add a class to the overlay

So does it make sense to have two similar stacks in the same stables?
Absolutely! ImageMapper is ideal for those more complicated image maps.

Comments

Stacked Images in RapidWeaver

I'm not in my office today. In fact, I'm not even in the country. Nevertheless, I just took a quick look at Tommy Hansen's iStack (DeFliGra, for those not familiar with the name) and while my design results are not terribly inspiring, iStack is.

iStack allows you to superimpose images, stacks and a caption over a background image. There are, of course, other stacks, or stack combinations that will allow you to do the same, but iStack drastically reduces the amount of work necessary for such a combination. All you need to do is drop your background image into iStack, add the second image and decide whether, or not you require an additional caption and stacks content. The standard stack settings make sure that you already have a perfect composition, but there's also room for creativity.

DeFliGra iSTack

So, using one of the 62 (sixty-two) stickers that Tommy has thoughtfully provided as a design aid, let's take a closer look:
Drag iStack (I hope Apple won't contest the name) into a Stacks' page and in the stack settings, you'll find an image well for the main image and for the overlay (all images can be warehoused).

Once you've added an images into each of the image wells, you'll need to activate Show Front Image, otherwise iStack functions as a simple caption stack. You can now switch to preview and you'll find Tommy's sticker positioned in the middle of your image and a caption at the bottom right.

Returning to the Settings Panel, you'll also find options to deactivate the caption and to Add a DropZone. You can add any stacks of your choice to the drop zone.

Stack settings

The first options are Layer Images (active by default) and Switch Front/Back
Link And Hover – Add Link, Hover Opacity, Hover Hue, Scale (back img)
Back Image – Show Back Img (active by default) Image Resource, Fill Width, Greyscale
Front Image – (not activated by default), Image Resource, Width Settings, Margin Settings, Adjust Left/Right Margin, Opacity, Hue
Edit / Publish Crop (container) – Crop, Max Height, Adjust Margin
Caption – (activated by default), Note (caption container), Font Size, Line Height, Colour background/text, Shadow settings, Border, Position Settings
DropZone – (not active by default) When activated – settings for size, position and shadow.
Breakpoint – Settings to adjust size and position of Front and Back images, Caption size and position and the DropZone size and position below a breakpoint

DeFliGra iStack

As is usual for DeFliGra's stacks, advanced CSS settings are available for each of the containers.

iStack is ideal for superimposing two (or three) images and a caption, or two images and a text and is really simple to use.
Combining iStack with GoGrid (see Tommy's combined offer), a product page for multiple items with superimposed price or special offer is child's play.
The two examples above each have a background and front image, plus caption and stacks content.

Comments

TOC for RapidWeaver

1LD has recently produced a number of interesting menu stacks. Jeremy and his crew just released Table Of Contents, which follows on in a similar vein, but offers a complete solution for on-page navigation.

A FAQs page immediately comes to mind, but Table Of Contents [TOC] can be used to build a complete page with article navigation.

TOC consists of two stacks and is simple to set up. Table Of Contents, the main stack, contains the complete setup for all TOC Article Child stacks, with the exception of the content type. The Content Type is individual for each child stack and can be set to Text (default) HTML, Markdown, or Stacks.

Once you've dragged the TOC 'master' stack onto your page, you can add title to the stack, then either drag in new content stacks from the Stacks' library, or simply click the + button to add a child stack. The TOC Content stack has a header area and a content area. When entering a header, it is automatically added to the contentlist.
The Content stacks may be dragged up or down inside the master stack, if you decide to change the order of your articles – the content list is then corrected accordingly.
It is possible to have more than one TOC stacks on your page.



1LD TOC

When one of the Articles from the content list is clicked, TOC automatically jumps to that article and displays a progress bar at the top of the page. As you move down, reading the article, the progress bar indicates how much of the article has been read.

1LD TOC
The clever thing about the progress indicator is – when you click the plus button at the top of the article, it opens the content list which now shows you which articles you have read and which articles you have yet to complete.

1LD TOC

Stack settings

Once more, you will find an endless list of settings for TOC.
Suffice it to say that all aspects of the stack may be set to suit your preferences.
Background Colour, Icon size and colours, Header and Text Size and Colours, Line Height, and the list of Fonts that has become usual for 1LD stacks.

I find Table Of Contents to be well thought out and simple to use. Just drop in your content, TOC will do the rest.
Experience TOC at a site near you very soon!

Comments

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